coming soon

Spanish influenza

One hundred years ago, the 1918 influenza pandemic wreaked havoc across the glove, affecting the health of about one-fifth of the world’s population. It caused the deaths of approximately 50-100 million people worldwide; more than the estimated 16 million lives claimed by the First World War. The first wave of ‘flu appeared in the spring of 1918, followed by a more virulent second wave in the autumn, and a third wave in the spring of 1919. In total, it is estimated that the epidemic claimed around a quarter of a million lives in Britain. Approximately 1663 of these deaths were from the Worcestershire area. Whilst media attention and history books have focused on the victorious end to the War the tragedy of the Spanish ‘Flu has been wiped from our collective memory.

Visit from January 2019 to find out more.

AT THE GEORGE MARSHALL MEDICAL MUSEUM

Along with informative permanent displays, the George Marshall Medical Museum has a programme of temporary exhibitions. These often include objects loaned from other organisations or individuals in the region. The current temporary displays are as below. 

 The Mann, The Artist, The Pharmacist, until November 2018  Click on this image to be taken to our online pages, specially created for this temporary exhibition.

The Mann, The Artist, The Pharmacist, until November 2018

Click on this image to be taken to our online pages, specially created for this temporary exhibition.

 Worcester Royal Infirmary Nurses' League, until December 2018  Curated by two of our volunteers (one an Associate Member of the Worcester Royal Infirmary Nurses' League), until December 2018 you can view our exhibition about the League, including photographs of members, past and present, and information about the important fund-raising activities of its members.

Worcester Royal Infirmary Nurses' League, until December 2018

Curated by two of our volunteers (one an Associate Member of the Worcester Royal Infirmary Nurses' League), until December 2018 you can view our exhibition about the League, including photographs of members, past and present, and information about the important fund-raising activities of its members.

See below for a programme of upcoming temporary exhibitions:

  • From February 2018: Display of Secret Recipes for Love Worcester Heritage Festival

  • From March to end June 2018: Modern surgical apparatus

  • From July to end year 2018: 70 Years of the NHS (Highlights from current research)

  • Coming to the museum in 2019: The Florence Nightingale Museum has secured Wellcome Trust Funding for an exhibition and events programme, in partnership with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and Queen Mary University London, commemorating the 1918-19 Influenza Pandemic. The Museum will be hosting a touring exhibition from the project from Spring 2019, showcasing local content to bring the facts of one of the deadliest natural disasters in human history to life for our local communities.

florence nightingale and the worcester infirmary

Sadly, you have now missed your chance to see rare plans from the archives and the Museum's copy of Florence Nightingale's Notes on Hospitals. The display about Florence Nightingale's impact on nursing and hospital design (and the changes which could have been implemented at Worcester Infirmary) has now been taken down. However, it was so popular, we have uploaded the exhibition interpretation for you, as below. You can still book an appointment with the Curator to view our copy of Notes on Hospitals. Contact us.

Click on the following links to download the three display panels produced by Volunteer Emily Cheetham. Panel 1 Panel 2 Panel 3.

at the Infirmary

Autopsy 2 copy.png

As part of a work placement in collaboration between the University of Worcester and The Infirmary I have been researching the history of post-mortem in relation to an autopsy kit which has been loaned by George Marshal Medical Museum. The kit itself is estimated to be from the 19th century, as indicated by the design of the tools and case.  At the start of the 19th century, professional autopsies had been a rare occurrence due to the practice being banned since the end of the roman conquest, with few exceptions.  However, autopsies became more common as the years progressed in response to the high demand of bodies by anatomists, who were becoming more reliant on the black market to provide bodies for them to work on. The kit is now on show at The Infirmary.

Stefan Simpson-Soye, Joint Honours History And Joint Politics: People & Power